Nesting

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I’m working on the third nest, the nest of transformation, composed of an old old print from when I was first learning about intaglio. It will have a ceramic base to sit on.

My teacher told me that it is possible to fire the ceramic base with the nest on it, and the burnt up nest will leave a mark on the ceramic piece. I’m really interested in pursuing this idea, but unfortunately I won’t be able to do this in the school kiln (we have to minimize the amount of combustible material that goes in), so I’ll have to find another kiln to use. Hm. But what a moving idea, right? A powerful exercise in letting go.

Nesting

Down and dirty (learning to let go)

Yesterday I talked to Sheila about the work I’ve been doing.  She gave me some useful feedback that I’ve been thinking a lot about; she told me that the embroideries are beautiful and perfect, but they lack an opposite force.  Basically she told me to add something “down and dirty”(…!) to create tension and interest in the work.

This made me realize that I’m super tidy.  I know exactly why; I’ve spent the last four years thinking about printmaking and bookmaking, where tidiness is usually celebrated.

I haven’t always been like this.  The top photo is a little piece that I made with Jake in our yard when we lived at the casitas back in 2009.  THERE IS ACTUAL DIRT ON IT that you can see, put there ON PURPOSE.  I even remember kicking it around in the gravel.  I think we were drinking margaritas and just having fun.

So now I’m going to try to be a little less uptight.  I haven’t decided exactly what to do with the embroideries yet, but Sheila is definitely right.  They need something down and dirty.

Down and dirty (learning to let go)

The self that is afraid of

 

“One is afraid of / the self that is afraid of”

 

“the self that is afraid of / the self that is afraid”

 

“One may perhaps speak of reflections. / (text by R.D. Laing)”

 

I made this book under the guidance of Barb Tetenbaum using text from R.D. Laing’s book Knots.  I was inspired by a slide presentation by the weaving instructor during my session, Peggy Hart.  I realized that I don’t know anything about weaving, and this made me realize that I’m unaware of my lack of knowledge about probably infinite other things.  And then I think in circles.

A lot of things became more clear to me while making this book: it’s ok to ground ideas by using someone else’s text, it’s good to play and simplify, I’m really interested in incorporating fibers into my work, and I want to make more traditional codices.  Even though this is a lepporello.

Hope you all are doing great.  xoxo

The self that is afraid of

Mini Pffft!, Mega Pffft!

I am starting a solo zine called Pffft!, and yesterday it branched into two different versions: Mini Pffft! (a xeroxed zine using an instant book structure) and Mega Pffft! (a more in-depth book with a letterpressed cover).  I’m learning that it’s good to have a mix of long-term, short-term and medium-term projects to keep busy with.

Apologies that this photo is awful.  Embarrassing!

xoxo

Mini Pffft!, Mega Pffft!